Where It's Always 1895

Being a collection of all things 221bish, and things related to actors involved in the BBC Sherlock show. Also, Tom Hiddleston. Do we really need a reason for that last one?

Other Tumblrs:

1. Marta's Mathoms (non-Sherlock fandoms)
2. The World Outside Your Door (RL seriousness)
3. Beautiful Things (animal, architecture, and other beautiful things to make me smile)

mild-lunacy:

marta-sherlock:

archipelagoarchaea wrote a very thorough and clearly well thought-out piece on “His Last Vow,” making the argument that Mary’s character hasn’t begun anything resembling the redemptive hero’s arc we see Sherlock going through, and perhaps more fundamentally that we’re meant to reject the “surface” reading of this episode and try to see a lot of what’s going on as lies or at least as obfuscation. It’s well-written and thought-provoking, and I highly suggest everyone entered in these things give it a read-through.

The Lie of His Last Vow

Let me be absolutely clear upfront that I haven’t been able to put anywhere near the amount of thought or writing effort into this piece that Archaea has. This is a reaction, not an original meta, and I don’t want to detract from her piece. I think in a lot of ways I agreed with her, and certainly felt my own more kinder!gentler!Mary (which isn’t the same as wanting her to go on as Mrs. Watson) interpretation more challenged (in a good way!) than I have by most other opposing views. Even if you like the idea of a Mary who doesn’t become a villain, even if you want her and John to go on to their stereotypically heterosexual happily-ever-after of a kid and a house in the suburbs (I put myself in the first camp but not in the second), I still really encourage you to give it a read. It’s thought-provoking and just fun to work through.

All that said… let me try to reply critically.

1) Archaea says that Mary hasn’t gone through any kind of a redemptive arc. I absolutely agree – but don’t think this has to mean she won’t go through that arc, just that it hasn’t happened yet. And that makes a certain amount of sense to me, because as much as our reaction to HLV has revolved around Mary’s character and past, the episode itself seems much more about Sherlock to me than Mary. The episode’s plot begins with John frustrated and board in suburbia, Sherlock being increasingly self-destructive in pursuit of a case, and it ends with Mary’s past putting John in danger and Sherlock being willing to kill (and kill in a way that will get him caught) to save him. And pretty much everything in between seems driven by two simple facts: John being married (to someone other than Sherlock) is harmful to both of them, and Mary has a past that threatens both of them. Even if she’d moved on from that past, or wanted to, John would still be miserable in suburbia, Sherlock would still be hollowed out on the inside from having lost John, and both of them (John in particular) would still be walking targets. It’s Sherlock’s progression from junkie (or ex-addict-willing-to-take-drugs-for-a-slight-advantage-in-a-case, if you prefer) to near-murder victim to dragon-slayer that’s so interesting, and so moving.

Read More

I guess I’m interested in one thing: the idea that if Mary’s going to be redeemed, it makes more sense to not build it up in HLV (because that would ruin the suspense) and instead only address it in Series 4. It’s true that the episode is really about Sherlock, and that the ‘real question’ (if not the cliffhanger) is about Mycroft; for that matter, Moriarty is a ‘real question’ as well. The point is really about what a cliffhanger is, which I think is interesting in itself. According to Wikipedia’s definition, it is “a plot device in fiction which features a main character in a precarious or difficult dilemma, or confronted with a shocking revelation at the end of an episode of serialized fiction”. So: the cliffhanger has to be something directly relevant to John or Sherlock, and it has to be something shocking or unexpected. By that metric, nothing to do with Mycroft fits; even if you go full-on M-Theory, it hasn’t actually been set up directly. A cliffhanger isn’t just a hanging plot-thread or question mark: it is whatever’s most obviously the dilemma we’re left with at the close of the episode. So, in fact, to say Mary’s the most obvious issue is to say that is the cliffhanger, in the broadest sense.

To get back to the question of pending redemption, it seems to intertwine in an interesting way with asking, what is the cliffhanger, precisely? Originally, archipelagoarchaea did address the question of timing, since we saw Mary’s reaction to Sherlock’s injury and months beyond. It would make sense to deal with Mary’s redemption in Series 4 if the shooting itself was the cliffhanger, but it’s not. It’s not even Mary’s identity, exactly, since we get a ‘deduction scene’ at the empty house, plus some clues from Magnussen (seemingly resolved by throwing the flash drive into the fire). Mary’s left grey and ambiguous, but that’s not an immediate threat after Magnussen was neutralized; that was the entire point of doing it. Again, the cliffhanger is the most obvious and most pressing issue facing the protagonists. What is it?

Read More

I was going to try to reply to this quickly, before going out, but I got caught up doing other things, and on rereading it, it really needs more than a quick response anyway. I’ll do my best to reply but it will most likely be late tonight, possibly tomorrow.

In the meantime I hope everyone will give mild-lunacy's comments a read. They're the kind of questions that need answering or at least ruminating over, and I'm honestly doubtful whether any response I make will be as thoughtprovoking as what she says here. Go read.

double-zero-agent-alison:

A pleasant evening to you.

(via granadabrettishholmes)

aseaofquotes:

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet

(via bakerstreetbabes)

sexualthorientation:

WHOA THERE TOM SLOW DOWN LETS NOT DO ANYTHING CRAZY

(via edoraslass)

navydream:

21.

(yeah, this is sort of after the fall… so John’s super concerned about not losing Sherlock again.)

fuckyeahteenlock:

touchedmuch:

Mini Mes

Pint size Sherlock and John are just too cute but the one with the gun is a little disturbing.

[X]

This is precious and weird at the same time.

For those of you concerned about the gun, I can’t be sure, but I’m fairly convinced that’s a fake gun. If it’s like the one my brother and I had, it makes a pow noise but doesn’t actually shoot.

… Which could be concerning on its own in the messages it sends to small children about guns being toys, I grant you, but I don’t think some parent is letting their toddler hold an actual gun for a cosplay. :-) And of course the rest of this is complete and utter brilliance. Nicely done, Sherlockian-parents (and Sherlockian-kids).

(via steampunksherlockian)

barachiki:

mrsashdown replied:

barachiki:

"I’m not exactly sure how this was supposed to make us feel better."

I NEED JOHN WITH FLOWERS IN HIS MOURNSTACHE HAROLD! PLEASE MAKE IT HAPPEN, sorry for all the caps, I had a sudden emotion.

Alright.

image

But my name isn’t Harold. ;)

(via finalproblem)

paintingmouse:

Arthur’s Christmas Tree

(via thefittongroundcrew)

I’m going to bring out right under your nose the most incredible crime of the century. And you will never suspect it until it’s too late. 

(via bakerstreetbabes)

It’s hell writing and it’s hell not writing. The only tolerable state is having just written.
Robert Hass (via victoriousvocabulary)

(via acafanmom)

Reblogging this meta (or response to someone else’s meta, more properly) I posted late last night, for those of you who actually require sleep …

marta-sherlock:

archipelagoarchaea wrote a very thorough and clearly well thought-out piece on “His Last Vow,” making the argument that Mary’s character hasn’t begun anything resembling the redemptive hero’s arc we see Sherlock going through, and perhaps more fundamentally that we’re meant to reject the “surface” reading of this episode and try to see a lot of what’s going on as lies or at least as obfuscation. It’s well-written and thought-provoking, and I highly suggest everyone entered in these things give it a read-through.

The Lie of His Last Vow

Let me be absolutely clear upfront that I haven’t been able to put anywhere near the amount of thought or writing effort into this piece that Archaea has. This is a reaction, not an original meta, and I don’t want to detract from her piece. I think in a lot of ways I agreed with her, and certainly felt my own more kinder!gentler!Mary (which isn’t the same as wanting her to go on as Mrs. Watson) interpretation more challenged (in a good way!) than I have by most other opposing views. Even if you like the idea of a Mary who doesn’t become a villain, even if you want her and John to go on to their stereotypically heterosexual happily-ever-after of a kid and a house in the suburbs (I put myself in the first camp but not in the second), I still really encourage you to give it a read. It’s thought-provoking and just fun to work through.

All that said… let me try to reply critically.

1) Archaea says that Mary hasn’t gone through any kind of a redemptive arc. I absolutely agree – but don’t think this has to mean she won’t go through that arc, just that it hasn’t happened yet. And that makes a certain amount of sense to me, because as much as our reaction to HLV has revolved around Mary’s character and past, the episode itself seems much more about Sherlock to me than Mary. The episode’s plot begins with John frustrated and board in suburbia, Sherlock being increasingly self-destructive in pursuit of a case, and it ends with Mary’s past putting John in danger and Sherlock being willing to kill (and kill in a way that will get him caught) to save him. And pretty much everything in between seems driven by two simple facts: John being married (to someone other than Sherlock) is harmful to both of them, and Mary has a past that threatens both of them. Even if she’d moved on from that past, or wanted to, John would still be miserable in suburbia, Sherlock would still be hollowed out on the inside from having lost John, and both of them (John in particular) would still be walking targets. It’s Sherlock’s progression from junkie (or ex-addict-willing-to-take-drugs-for-a-slight-advantage-in-a-case, if you prefer) to near-murder victim to dragon-slayer that’s so interesting, and so moving.

Read More

bakerstreetbabes:

not even Sherlock Holmes shaves for Sherlock Holmes.

bakerstreetbabes:

not even Sherlock Holmes shaves for Sherlock Holmes.

francesksgk:

starjohn’s body part will glow in dark if it goes into a dark place


So wrong it’s right. :-)

francesksgk:

starjohn’s body part will glow in dark if it goes into a dark place

So wrong it’s right. :-)

(via consultingsmartarse)

tea-at-221b:

The Baker Street Irregulars

Informal (and sadly low quality) photo of all the Irregulars.

(via steampunksherlockian)

pulvis:

jaj-vmd:

Sherlock and John by *Pulvis

wow, i’m so shallow to reblog my own art XD

(via penns-woods)